ASCB Rainbow


Subgroup D

Subgroup D: Cilia: Traffic, Signals, Disease

8:30 am – 12:30 pm, Room 120B
Organizers: Max Nachury, University of California, San Francisco; Peter Jackson, Stanford; and Jeremy Reiter, University of California, San Francisco

This special interest subgroup on cilia serves as a point of convergence for human geneticists working on kidney and eye diseases, for developmental biologists aiming to understand the Hedgehog pathway and left-right axis patterning, and for cell biologists interested in compartmentalized signal transduction. Researchers from the diverse fields that intersect with ciliary biology will discuss the interplay between membrane trafficking, signaling and disease.

Presentations:

8:30-8:35 am- Introduction. Jeremy Reiter, University of California, San Francisco
8:35-8:53 am- Mechanisms of ciliary signaling. Jeremy Reiter, University of California, San Francisco
8:53-9:11 am- Regulation of primary cilia formation in the mouse. Kathryn Anderson, Sloan-Kettering
9:11-9:29 am- Response of immotile cilia to the fluid flow for establishing left-right asymmetry. Hiroshi Hamada, Riken Kobe
9:29-9:47 am- Structure and function of the BBSome. Max Nachury, University of California, San Francisco
9:47-10:05 am- Role of cilia in congenital heart disease and the neurodevelopmental outcome of congenital heart disease patients. Cecilia Lo, University of Pittsburgh
10:05-10:23 am- Ciliary control of stem cell function. Peter Jackson, Stanford
10:23-10:42 am- Break
10:42-11:00 am- Cilia regulation of injury response in the kidney and during cyst development. Brad Yoder, University of Alabama at Birmingham
11:00-11:18 am- Mechanisms underlying renal ciliopathies. Sophie Saunier, IMAGINE institute, Inserm UMR1163
11:18-11:36 am- A phase-separated organelle at the root of motile ciliopathy. Ryan Huizar, (Wallingford Lab) University of Texas at Austin
11:36-11:54 am- Photoreceptor discs are formed through suppression of ciliary ectosome release. Vadim Arshavsky, Duke
11:54 am-12:12 pm- Understanding the molecular etiology of craniofacial ciliopathies. Samantha Brugmann, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital
12:12-12:30 pm- A comprehensive portrait of cilia and ciliopathies from a CRISPR-based screen for Hedgehog signaling. David Breslow, Yale

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